CRAIG CONLEY (Prof. Oddfellow) is recognized by Encarta as “America’s most creative and diligent scholar of letters, words and punctuation.” He has been called a “language fanatic” by Page Six gossip columnist Cindy Adams, a “cult hero” by Publisher’s Weekly, and “a true Renaissance man of the modern era, diving headfirst into comprehensive, open-minded study of realms obscured or merely obscure” by Clint Marsh. An eccentric scholar, Conley’s ideas are often decades ahead of their time. He invented the concept of the “virtual pet” in 1980, fifteen years before the debut of the popular “Tamagotchi” in Japan. His virtual pet, actually a rare flower, still thrives and has reached an incomprehensible size. Conley’s website is OneLetterWords.com.
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A Turkish Delight of musings on languages, deflations of metaphysics, vauntings of arcana, and great visual humor.
March 31, 2008

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
To the dim-lit shore of the mind
Strange things come drifting
When the tide is high.
—Emmy Veronica Sanders, "Driftwood"


Image source.  Via ffffound.
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Colorful Allusions (permalink)

Right next to the pond were patches of dark green succulent leaves, dark red at their edges. Where the green shaded into red was a color he couldn’t name, a dark lustrous brown stuffed somehow with both its constituent colors. He would have to call up a color chart soon, it seemed: lately when looking around outdoors he found that a color chart came in handy about once a minute. Waxy almost- white flowers were tucked under some these bicolored leaves. Farther on lay some tangles, red- stalked, green- needled, like beached seaweed in miniature. Again that intermixture of red and green, right there in nature staring at him.
—Kim Stanley Robinson, Blue Mars, 1993.

* Though printed in black and white, great literature is bursting with vibrant colour. In this rebus-style puzzle, color words and parts of words have been replaced with colored boxes. Try to guess the exact hue of each. Roll your mouse over the colored boxes to reveal the missing words. Click the colored boxes to learn more about each hue. Special thanks to Paul Dean for his colorful research.
 
> read more from Colorful Allusions . . .

March 30, 2008

Uncharted Territories (permalink)


> read more from Uncharted Territories . . .


Unicorns (permalink)


See full-size image here.
> read more from Unicorns . . .


Book of Whispers (permalink)
Piecing together the secret of the seven pagodas . . .


 
* The most profound secrets lie not wholly in knowledge, said the poet.  They lurk invisible in that vitalizing spark, intangible, yet as evident as the lightning—the seeker's soul.  Solitary digging for facts can reward one with great discoveries, but true secrets are not discovered—they are shared, passed on in confidence from one to another.  The genuine seeker listens attentively.

No secret can be transcribed, save in code, lest it—by definition—cease to be.  This Book of Whispers collects and encodes more than one hundred of humankind's most cherished secrets.  To be privy to the topics alone is a supreme achievement, as each contains and nurtures the seed of its hidden truth.  As possessor and thereby guardian of this knowledge, may you summon the courage to honor its secrets and to bequeath it to one worthy.
> read more from Book of Whispers . . .

March 29, 2008

The Right Word (permalink)
From A Surrealist Dictionary by J. Karl Bogartte:

DANCE: An invisible doorway in a wall to which sleepwalkers are invariably drawn.


Photo by lcrf.
> read more from The Right Word . . .


I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)

by pootj

The Search for Silent Colors

We all know garishly loud colors when we see them. Typically in the range of red, orange, and yellow, loud colors are unwelcome in business attire, unless one's business happens to be the circus. And we all know quiet colors by their instant calming effect. The quiet range of blue, green, and violet is beloved by home designers. But what of silent colors? If they exist, would we find them in cloistered monasteries, or hushed libraries, or ruined castles?

The American ornithologist Roger Tory Peterson found a "sea of silent colors" when he tearfully witnessed the grandeur of the Grand Canyon for the first time. He reported a vivid array of silent reds, yellows, grays, and lavenders (Wild America, 1997).


by davidanthonyporter

The poet A. F. Moritz found silent colors within the curves of a white seashell. He described a "diminished spectrum" of "shades of milk" ("You, Whoever You Are," Early Poems, 1983). The naturalist Timothy Duane found "the silent colors of winter" blanketing the Sierra mountain chain (Shaping the Sierra, 2000).

When feminist activist Ginny Foat found herself incarcerated, she discovered silent grays, blacks, and greens in the steel and cinder blocks of her cell (Never Guilty, Never Free, 1985).

[Read the entire article in my guest blog at ColourLovers.com.]
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .

March 28, 2008

Go Out in a Blaze of Glory (permalink)
"He was a many-faceted man who combined the unlikely qualities of both daring adventurer and scholar."
—Mary Lovell, A Rage to Live

-----

Jonathan responds:

I followed a trail to find the context for this image. I thought it was going to be a 1960s Batman episode, in which "Diamond Head" and his gang knock over Tiffanelbow & Co.



See full size photo here.
> read more from Go Out in a Blaze of Glory . . .


Colorful Allusions (permalink)

Her evening gown was of an ivory- colored taffeta. The billowing skirt did justice to the effect of the stiff, cold, voluminous taffeta, on which the grain of shifting light flowed and opened up its quiet, silver, dead, long, slender eyes. Color was provided by a cattleya pinned to her bodice. The faint yellow, pink, and purple velum, surrounded by violet petals, imparted the coquetry and shyness peculiar to members of the orchid family. From her necklace of little Indian nuts strung on a yellow gold chain, from her loose lavender elbow- length gloves, from the orchid on her bodice, the fresh odor of perfume like the air after a rain wafted its charms.
—Yukio Mishima, Forbidden Colors, 1953. Translated from the Japanese by Alfred H. Marks, 1968.

* Though printed in black and white, great literature is bursting with vibrant colour. In this rebus-style puzzle, color words and parts of words have been replaced with colored boxes. Try to guess the exact hue of each. Roll your mouse over the colored boxes to reveal the missing words. Click the colored boxes to learn more about each hue. Special thanks to Paul Dean for his colorful research.
 
> read more from Colorful Allusions . . .

March 27, 2008

Puzzles and Games (permalink)

Maynard the Genie, from Maynardland.com.
The "Spirit of the Game"

(an Abecedarian guest blog for DeepFun.com)

Without the spirit of the game,
what would the game be?
—Nevin H. Gibson,
The Encyclopedia of Golf

Arabian folklore tells of a wish-granting genie imprisoned in an oil lamp or bottle. Might players innocently conjure such a spirit in a game of spin-the-bottle? Indeed, every game has a motivating force at the heart of it -- its own sort of soul. Whatever we might call it -- essence, atmosphere, intention, or ethos -- it's that special spark that distinguishes the game from all others. Like a genie of folklore, the Spirit of the Game grants good sports a wish -- the ultimate wish. (We'll get to that in a moment.)

The Spirit of the Game is not necessarily spelled out in the rules. Indeed, "There are situations in which adherence to the so-called letter of the rules can be taken to violate the spirit of the game."[1] The Spirit of the Game is a distillation of the intent of the rules. It has been called "a self-regulating set of norms without which some games would degenerate into anarchy."[2] It is a frame of mind, not a commandment carved in stone. It's a point of view, a sense of humor, a strength of character. Novelist Richard Le Gallienne summed it up perfectly: "To be whimsical, therefore, in pursuit of a whim, fanciful in the chase of a fancy, is surely but to maintain the spirit of the game."[3]

Because it is typically undefined, the Spirit of the Game can be abused. Unsportsmanlike conduct (like taunting and intimidation) is one indication of abuse; bringing the game into disrepute is another.[4] When honored across the board, the Spirit of the Game turns opponents into equals. Most importantly, it engenders fun. While camaraderie is jolly and competition is stimulating, "the real spirit of the game is all about having fun."[5]

Though each game has its own unique Spirit, there are some universal characteristics. The Spirit of the Game is:

• even-tempered
• self-possessed, yet unselfish
• levelheaded
• well-balanced
• untroubled
• either easygoing or animated
• motivated
• spontaneous
• committed
• earnest
• disciplined
• wholehearted
• courteous
• honorable
• responsible
• idealistic

Ultimately, the Spirit of the Game "is the only thing in the game which is lasting."[6]

Corporate trainer Julius E. Eitington makes an interesting observation: when players become caught up in the Spirit of the Game, they "become themselves."[7] What is one's true self, but that of a player on the grand game board of life? Edward Clark Marsh once described being enlivened by the Spirit of the Game: "If it was not for a moment real life, it at least made you wish it were."[8]

Other signs that the Spirit of the Game is present include:

• both sides wish each other good luck
• both sides cheer one another (winning or losing is secondary; the game itself is a victory for all [9])
• everyone plays fair (no cheating, no bending of the rules)
• players celebrate the game's tradition, safeguard its precedent, and carry on its legacy
• players supervise themselves. Game scientist Andrew Thornton notes that "There is no agreed upon definition of the Spirit of the Game, but there is a pervasive sense that one should play by it. The Spirit of the Game is the Police" inside each player's head.[10]

But we've neglected the quintessential sign that the Spirit of the Game is present. And that's when the ultimate wish is granted: the firing shot that sets play into motion. When the game is afoot, all else is inconsequential!

Fun Facts about the Spirit of the Game:

• In Ultimate Frisbee, where there are no referees and no penalties, the Spirit of the Game is the underlying philosophy. "The Ultimate player will always praise and support successful actions on both teams. It is a normal thing to introduce yourself to the opponent at the beginning of every point and to wish him a good game. And after the game both teams stand in a circle talking about the game and singing a song for the opponent team. So it is a lot more than just a short handshake after a game."[11]
• The Spirit of the Game comes into play "before the game has even begun."[12]
• "Soccer is unique among sports in that the official's job is first and foremost to maintain the spirit of the game as well as the safety of all concerned; this concern outweighs all other laws of the game."[13]
• The Spirit of the Game of soccer has been traced back to the early to mid nineteenth century, when the game developed from its folk roots into its modern form.[14]
• The Spirit of the Game of curling "demands good sportsmanship, kindly feeling, and honourable conduct."[15]
• The Fighting Spirit of the Game of American football is persistently aggressive in nature: "Throughout the history of football, the violent spirit of the game has endured, even as other elements of the game have changed."[16]
• The Spirit of the Game of lacrosse "is a feeling of honor and dignity."[17]
• The Spirit of the Game reminds players that not everything is a matter of life and death, that consequences are temporary, and that results are not critical.[6]
• The Spirit of the Game teaches players to "accept success with grace and failure with restraint."[18]
• The Spirit of the Game of golf is characterized by disciplined conduct, courtesy, and sportsmanship at all times.[19]

[1] Allan C. Hutchinson, It's All in the Game, 2000, p. 195.
[2] Lincoln Allison, Amateurism in Sport, 2001, p. 161.
[3] The Quest of the Golden Girl, 1897, p. 35.
[4] William John Morgan, Ethics in Sport, 2007, p. 126.
[5] Richard Carlson, The Don't Sweat Guide to Golf, 2002, p. 205.
[6] Division for Girls' and Women's Sports, Sports Programs for College Women, June 21-27, 1969, p. 23.
[7] The Winning Trainer, 2001, p. 142.
[8] "Anthony Hope's 'Sophy of Kravonia,'" The Bookman, 1907, p. 381.
[9] Modris Eksteins, Rites of Spring, 2000, p. 124.
[10] Belinda Wheaton, ed., Understanding Lifestyle Sport, 2004, p. 187.
[11] Jorg Bahl, Ultimate Frisbee, 2007, p. 4.
[12] John Byl, Co-Ed Recreational Games, 2002, p. 205.
[13] Andy Caruso, Soccer Coaching, 1996, p. 29.
[14] Sharon Colwell, "The 'Letter' and the 'Spirit': Football Laws and Refereeing in the Twenty-First Century," The Future of Football, 2000, p. 201.
[15] Gary Belsky & Neil Fine, 23 Ways to Get to First Base, 2007, p. 209.
[16] William D. Dean, The American Spiritual Culture, 2002, p. 148.
[17] Steve Bristol, quoted in Our Game: The Character and Culture of Lacrosse by John M. Yeager, 2005, p. 79.
[18] Hubert Vogelsinger, The Challenge of Soccer, 1973, p. 274.
[19] United States Golf Association, Golf Rules Illustrated, 2004, p. 4.
> read more from Puzzles and Games . . .


Book of Whispers (permalink)
Piecing together the secret of serenity . . .


 
* The most profound secrets lie not wholly in knowledge, said the poet.  They lurk invisible in that vitalizing spark, intangible, yet as evident as the lightning—the seeker's soul.  Solitary digging for facts can reward one with great discoveries, but true secrets are not discovered—they are shared, passed on in confidence from one to another.  The genuine seeker listens attentively.

No secret can be transcribed, save in code, lest it—by definition—cease to be.  This Book of Whispers collects and encodes more than one hundred of humankind's most cherished secrets.  To be privy to the topics alone is a supreme achievement, as each contains and nurtures the seed of its hidden truth.  As possessor and thereby guardian of this knowledge, may you summon the courage to honor its secrets and to bequeath it to one worthy.
> read more from Book of Whispers . . .

March 26, 2008

Go Out in a Blaze of Glory (permalink)
James Altucher, author of Trade Like a Hedge Fund, honored my "10 Little-Known Facts" guest blog for Grow-a-Brain as one of "the Web's most timely, topical posts."
> read more from Go Out in a Blaze of Glory . . .


Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:


 
 
Artwork inspired by the writings of J. Karl Bogartte.
Printed collections of Forgotten Wisdom diagrams are available: Volume I from Mindful Greetings and Volumes II, III and IV from Amazon.  Selected posters are also available via Zazzle.
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .


Go Out in a Blaze of Glory (permalink)


Source: Andrew Kreps Gallery.  Via ffffound.
> read more from Go Out in a Blaze of Glory . . .

March 25, 2008

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)

Artwork by Alan Kitching.  Image source
"Once more I wondered, as I had the first time I saw him, why these handsome features didn't add up to a handsome face."
Zeruya Shalev, Love Life (2001)
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Colorful Allusions (permalink)

Mr. Wonka was standing all alone just inside the open gates of the factory. / And what an exraordinary little man he was! / He had a black top hat on his head. / He wore a tail coat made of a beautiful plum- colored velvet. / His trousers were bottle green. / His gloves were pearly gray. / And in one hand he carried a fine gold- topped walking cane. / Covering his chin, there was a small neat pointed black beard a goatee. And his eyes his eyes were most marvelously bright. They seemed to be sparkling and twinkling at you all the time.
—Roald Dahl, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, 1964.

* Though printed in black and white, great literature is bursting with vibrant colour. In this rebus-style puzzle, color words and parts of words have been replaced with colored boxes. Try to guess the exact hue of each. Roll your mouse over the colored boxes to reveal the missing words. Click the colored boxes to learn more about each hue. Special thanks to Paul Dean for his colorful research.
 
> read more from Colorful Allusions . . .

March 24, 2008

Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
A newspaper headline:

Inflation Hits Acrimonious Wits

Cheap Irony At All-Time Low

> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .


I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
The best place to learn long division is at a multiplication table.


By artist Mark Shunney.
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .

March 23, 2008

The Right Word (permalink)
Information Prose :: A Manifesto in 47 Points :: Version 1.0

by Jeremy P. Bushnell, jeremy@invisible-city.com

26. Our daily thoughts appear whole only within contexts which run deep and often go unthought: were anyone to inspect the running ticker of our mental dialogue, much of it would seem to be fragments. Writing which purports to be interested in the complexity of other human beings must reflect this.

27. Incorporating uncited or decontextualized fragments and samples into a creative work brings a certain level of noise into the signal. This admittedly runs the risk of creating confusion in the mind of the audience.

28. The initial communication of new information always creates some confusion. But that confusion indicates promise to certain recipients.

29. There is no evidence that what audiences want most from a creative work is the clear transmission of simple information. Audiences will accept high levels of noise in a creative work if the creative work is achieving other effects or satisfying other needs.

30. "[We take] the text, with its unreliable transmission of information, to be a component of a larger system, that of cultural circulation, in which what seemed like a dysfunction at a first level of communication would turn out to be a positive element contributing to the complexity of the larger system." —William Paulson, The Noise of Culture

31. To remove it from a creative context for a moment, consider: one reason meeting new people is appealing is because they may know things that you don’t know, or they may understand things in a different way from you. The process of communicating with someone who thinks differently from you (because their thoughts are defined by different contexts) carries with it a necessary degree of noise, but the process of translating that noise into new meaning can be immensely rewarding, intellectually, emotionally, and creatively.

32. "[Disorder and noise] can become information to us, can bring us to more subtle forms of understanding, because it is the unexpected, the radically different to which we can respond only because we are already complex beings capable of yet more complexity." —William Paulson, The Noise of Culture

33. Experiencing characters in a work of fiction should be rewarding in that same fashion. Reducing the noise in the signal simplifies out human difference for the sake of accessibility and creates work that is pleasant but does not bring us to new understanding.

34. Information prose writers must write for an audience that finds noise and its attendant uncertainty stimulating. Much contemporary writing neglects them.

35. "[Young people] are more tolerant of being out of control, more tolerant of that exploratory phase where the rules don’t all make sense and few goals have been clearly defined. The hard work of tomorrow’s interactive design will be to explore that tolerance — that suspension of control — in ways that enlighten us." —Steven Johnson

36. Currently, the writers doing the most work towards some of information prose’s goals are hypertext writers.

37. Hypertext writers are not necessarily information prose writers, and not all information prose writers will seek to be hypertext writers, but hypertext has merits that should be considered by writers of information prose.

38. Some hypertexts consist solely of navigable webs of interlinked fragments. Some information prose writers may find this approach fruitful. But hypertextuality need not be incompatible with more traditional narrative. Utilizing hypertext does not mean that writers need to relinquish the many obvious merits of a linear story; the comfort of a prescribed order, of a beginning, middle, and end.

(to be continued)
> read more from The Right Word . . .


Book of Whispers (permalink)
Piecing together the secret of self-recognition . . .


 
* The most profound secrets lie not wholly in knowledge, said the poet.  They lurk invisible in that vitalizing spark, intangible, yet as evident as the lightning—the seeker's soul.  Solitary digging for facts can reward one with great discoveries, but true secrets are not discovered—they are shared, passed on in confidence from one to another.  The genuine seeker listens attentively.

No secret can be transcribed, save in code, lest it—by definition—cease to be.  This Book of Whispers collects and encodes more than one hundred of humankind's most cherished secrets.  To be privy to the topics alone is a supreme achievement, as each contains and nurtures the seed of its hidden truth.  As possessor and thereby guardian of this knowledge, may you summon the courage to honor its secrets and to bequeath it to one worthy.
> read more from Book of Whispers . . .

March 22, 2008

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)

by Raf Artista

How to Create Sublime Colors

What color is so awe-inspiring, so out-of-this-world that it elevates viewers to new heights of wonderment? The quest for the sublime color is as old as pigment and likely older still. Imagine the first humans to witness a majestic sunrise. They’d have had a transcendental experience, in that sublime colors open a window into a realm of grandeur beyond mere human experience. Imagine the first artists experimenting with dyes like alchemists in search of the Philosopher’s Stone, driven to discover the secret of sublime color and to possess the power to turn the ordinary into something extraordinary.

Sublime colors are commonly described as being:

  • incomparably beautiful
  • exquisite
  • cheerful
  • timeless
  • soft
  • active
  • natural (sunrise, clouds, rainbows, mountains, or sea, for example)
  • radiant
  • sentimental
  • magnificent
  • glorious
  • lofty, divine (in that they foster a spiritual experience)
  • shimmering
 
Ultraviolet and deep indigo are often called sublime, and black more so. Color expert Benjamin Jan Kouwer notes that Western culture once hailed yellow as a sublime color with a favorable symbolic meaning (Colors and Their Character, 1949). Color mixers usually discover sublime beauty by accident, but art teacher Gabriel Boray suggests that artists can hone their sense of the sublime through careful practice.

Boray developed a system for sublime color mixing. Through his system, colorists learn to feel when a color is “singing.” Boray instructs the colorist to begin with two complementary colors of the same temperature (such as a warm yellow and a warm ultramarine). “Mix 5 variations between them, from yellow-green to blue-green, paying careful attention to separating them enough to be recognized as a unique variation.” By adding a tiny amount of blue into the yellow, then a bit more, and more again, each variation will be distinct. “After you have 5 clear color variations between those two, create one in between each (there may be many more than one), until you have 10 variations. Now look at those colors. Are they clean and unique? They should be singing. If they aren’t singing, you are to immediately find the correct light to see the variations properly, or rush outside, close your eyes, and take 10 deep breaths while telling yourself you are a master of color! If the colors exist—and an infinite amount of colors exist—then you can identify them.”

Boray assures that “When you open your eyes you will see nature as you may never have before. Return to your exercise, choose two more colors and continue. Combine as many pairs of colors, creating 5, then 10, or more variations. Gradually you will begin to feel the changes in your blood. Go outside again and look at something in nature. Make a ring with your thumb and forefinger and look as if through a magnifying glass. See the infinite variations. The same colors you see are available to you for painting. There is no barrier between your mind and your brush.”

[Read the entire article in my guest blog at ColourLovers.com.]
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .

March 21, 2008

Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
Many pupils learn to count on their fingers, but few are taught to avoid the double twelve and twenty-six.  Hence the "error index."


Image source.  Via ffffound.
> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .


Colorful Allusions (permalink)

That marvellous landscape of my dream / Which no eye knows, nor ever will / At moments, wide awake, I seem / To grasp, and it excites me still. . . .

Blue sheets of water, left and right, / Spread between quays of rose and green, / To the world’s end and out of sight, / And still expanded, though unseen.

Enchanted rivers, those with jade / And jasper were their banks bedecked; / Enormous mirrors, dazzled, made / Dizzy by all they did reflect.

And many a Ganges, taciturn / And heedless, in the vaulted air, / Poured out of the treasure of its urn / Into a gulf of diamond there.

As architect, it tempted me / To tame the ocean at its source; / And this I did, I made the sea / Under a jewelled culvert course.

And every colour, even black, / Became prismatic, polished, bright; / The liquid gave its glory back / Mounted in iridescent light.
—Charles Baudelaire (1821–1867), "Parisian Dream," translated by Edna St. Vincent Millay, 1936.

* Though printed in black and white, great literature is bursting with vibrant colour. In this rebus-style puzzle, color words and parts of words have been replaced with colored boxes. Try to guess the exact hue of each. Roll your mouse over the colored boxes to reveal the missing words. Click the colored boxes to learn more about each hue. Special thanks to Paul Dean for his colorful research.
 
> read more from Colorful Allusions . . .

March 20, 2008

The Right Word (permalink)
"It's not like someone could steal the words right off the page."
Terry Goodkind, Chainfire

"Lift the words off the page in order to make them go right."
—Richard Chase, quoted in Who Says? by Carol Birch and Melissa Heckler

"Interaction with literary language implies lifting the words off the page to new levels of creativity, connections, and criticism in collaboration with others."
Shelby Anne Wolf, Interpreting Literature with Children

"Let the words jump off the page and land in my heart."
John Steger, Spiritual Joe


"The Typography of Paper Cutting" by Hina Aoyama.  Source.  Via ffffound.
> read more from The Right Word . . .


Book of Whispers (permalink)
Piecing together the secret of secrets . . .


 
* The most profound secrets lie not wholly in knowledge, said the poet.  They lurk invisible in that vitalizing spark, intangible, yet as evident as the lightning—the seeker's soul.  Solitary digging for facts can reward one with great discoveries, but true secrets are not discovered—they are shared, passed on in confidence from one to another.  The genuine seeker listens attentively.

No secret can be transcribed, save in code, lest it—by definition—cease to be.  This Book of Whispers collects and encodes more than one hundred of humankind's most cherished secrets.  To be privy to the topics alone is a supreme achievement, as each contains and nurtures the seed of its hidden truth.  As possessor and thereby guardian of this knowledge, may you summon the courage to honor its secrets and to bequeath it to one worthy.
> read more from Book of Whispers . . .

March 19, 2008

Hindpsych: Erstwhile Conjectures by the Sometime Augur of Yore (permalink)
Today's Question:

Did Britney Spears shave her head in February 2007?

With hindpsych, the answer is "yes"!  In our Tarot spread, we see an imagination running rampant in the first card, the Seven of Cups.  Here are depicted dreams, illusions, and seemingly limitless possibilities, all symbolic of a crazy environment marked by self-indulgence.  Note that the person in this card is imagining a full head of hair in the top left cup, followed by the smooth head of a draped figure next to the serpent of temptation.  The middle card is the Seven of Pentacles, symbolic of assessing one's status.  The figure in this card has reached a milestone and is enjoying the fruits of his labor.  This card suggests that Britney has reached a crossroads and is thinking about change.  The final card, the Ace of Swords, depicts a blade on a crown, and by extension scissors upon a head.  We can say with confidence that Britney shaves her head in 2007, and we can now move on.


Tarot card images via Wikpiedia.
* Historians must reconstruct the past out of hazy memory.  "Once upon a time" requires "second sight."  The "third eye" of intuition can break the "fourth wall" of conventional perspectives.  Instead of "pleading the fifth," historians can take advantage of the "sixth sense" and be in "seventh heaven."  All with the power of hindpsych, the "eighth wonder of the world."  It has been said that those who forget the past are condemned to repeat it.  Therein lies the importance of Tarot readings for antiquity.  When we confirm what has already occurred, we break the shackles of the past, freeing ourselves to chart new courses into the future.
> read more from Hindpsych: Erstwhile Conjectures by the Sometime Augur of Yore . . .


Colorful Allusions (permalink)

It is now one of those intensely golden sunsets which kindles the whole horizon into one blaze of glory, and makes the water another sky. The lake lay in rosy or golden streaks, save where white- winged vessels glided hither and thither, like so many spirits, and little golden stars twinkled through the glow, and looked down at themselves as they trembled in the water.
—Harriet Beecher Stowe, Uncle Tom’s Cabin, 1852.

* Though printed in black and white, great literature is bursting with vibrant colour. In this rebus-style puzzle, color words and parts of words have been replaced with colored boxes. Try to guess the exact hue of each. Roll your mouse over the colored boxes to reveal the missing words. Click the colored boxes to learn more about each hue. Special thanks to Paul Dean for his colorful research.
 
> read more from Colorful Allusions . . .

March 18, 2008

Unicorns (permalink)
"When picking code names for new software versions, generally you want to stay away from anything that implies mythological or 'often mentioned, never seen' status -- users may get the wrong idea.  That said, given the long wait that loyal Retrospect users have had for new developments on the Mac side from EMC Insignia (formerly Dantz), I'll forgive the unfortunate choice of 'Unicorn' for the beta of the Retrospect client for Mac ..." —Michael Rose, The Unofficial Apple Weblog.
> read more from Unicorns . . .


Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)

Doctor Who's David Tennant.  Image via.
Doctor Who riddles:

1. What's Doctor Who's favorite English rock band?
2. What's Doctor Who's favorite household appliance?
3. What's Doctor Who's favorite American sitcom from the mid-to-late 1980's?
4. What's Doctor Who's favorite American restaurant chain that targets male customers with a serving staff comprising only waitresses?
5. What's Doctor Who's favorite genre of book or film?
6. What's Doctor Who's favorite chocolate-flavored soft drink?
7. What's Doctor Who's favorite improv comedy show?
8. What's Doctor Who's favorite Dr. Seuss story?
9. What's Doctor Who's favorite Australian rock band that combines elements of sixties power-pop, bubblegum pop, Beatle-esque harmonies, psychedelia and grungy garage rock?
10. What's Doctor Who's favorite smoking device?
11. What's Doctor Who's favorite Wham-O toy?
12. What's Doctor Who's favorite Mayan deity?
13. What's Doctor Who's favorite escapologist?  (Thanks Ken and Ann!)
14. What's Doctor Who's favorite Spanish crooner?  (Thanks Ken and Ann!)
15. What's Doctor Who's favorite glam-rock group?  (Thanks Ken and Ann!)
16. What's Doctor Who's favorite Greek chickpea dip  (Thanks Ken and Ann!)
17. What's Doctor Who's favorite bootleg liquor?  (Thanks Ken and Ann!)

Answers:
1. The Who
2. A Hoover.
3. "Who's the Boss?"
4. Hooters.
5. the Whodunnit
6. Yoo-hoo
7. "Whose Line is it Anyway?"
8. Horton Hears a Who!
9. Hoodoo Gurus
10. A hookah
11. the Hula Hoop
12. Hunab Ku
13. Houdini
14. Julio Iglesias
15. Mott the Hoople
16. Hummus
17. Hooch (or in Chinese, Huangjiu)
> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .

March 17, 2008

Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
Finally, a set of hourglasses for every occasion, including:
  • the 1 minute manager
  • the 2 minute warning
  • the 3 minute egg
  • the 4 minute mile
  • the 5 minute break
  • the 6 minute walk test
  • the 7 minute difference
  • the 8 minute epic
  • the 9 minute chariot race


Hourglass Rise and Fall by Reico Yamaguchi (1996).  Image via vvork.
> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .


Book of Whispers (permalink)
Piecing together the secret of the sea . . .


 


Waianapanapa Secret Sea Cave, Island of Maui.  By Rickreh.  See large version here.
* The most profound secrets lie not wholly in knowledge, said the poet.  They lurk invisible in that vitalizing spark, intangible, yet as evident as the lightning—the seeker's soul.  Solitary digging for facts can reward one with great discoveries, but true secrets are not discovered—they are shared, passed on in confidence from one to another.  The genuine seeker listens attentively.

No secret can be transcribed, save in code, lest it—by definition—cease to be.  This Book of Whispers collects and encodes more than one hundred of humankind's most cherished secrets.  To be privy to the topics alone is a supreme achievement, as each contains and nurtures the seed of its hidden truth.  As possessor and thereby guardian of this knowledge, may you summon the courage to honor its secrets and to bequeath it to one worthy.
> read more from Book of Whispers . . .

March 16, 2008

The Right Word (permalink)
From A Surrealist Dictionary by J. Karl Bogartte:

SOLSTICE: The luminous blue fog surrounding a human body when the mind is elsewhere.


Photo by marmota.
> read more from The Right Word . . .


Colorful Allusions (permalink)

It was a green sunset. The reds, the oranges, the purples which Amanda automatically associated with sunsets had been snuffed out in the soggy cloud pile, and the nearly invisible sun that sank beyond the fields, sloughs, rock islands and tide flats into Puget Sound, it looked like an unripe olive photographed through gauze.
—Tom Robbins, Another Roadside Attraction, 1971.

* Though printed in black and white, great literature is bursting with vibrant colour. In this rebus-style puzzle, color words and parts of words have been replaced with colored boxes. Try to guess the exact hue of each. Roll your mouse over the colored boxes to reveal the missing words. Click the colored boxes to learn more about each hue. Special thanks to Paul Dean for his colorful research.
 
> read more from Colorful Allusions . . .

March 15, 2008

Do-Re-Midi (permalink)
Come in the evening, or come in the morning;
Come when you're looked for, or come without warning;
Kisses and welcome you'll find here before you,
And the oftener you come here the more I'll adore you!
John Williamson Palmer, Folk Songs (1861)

Don't miss the twee pop band Original Silly Pillows, who coincidentally have a song called "Come in the Evening" (hear it on their MySpace page).
> read more from Do-Re-Midi . . .


I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)

by superdove

Blonde Pony Tails: The Human-Horse Connection

cwalker71.jpg
by cwalker71.
Humans have been fascinated by white horses for millennia. Geneticists have now pinpointed the "genetic architecture" that connects blonde manes in people and equines. The study of white horses goes all the way back to ancient Rome, where depigmented horses were identified as "candidus" (white) or "glaucus" (gray). The PLoS Genetics journal notes that two thousand years ago, the white horse was held sacred by the Saxons. It served as an augur for the German tribes, its behavior considered a sign of divine approval or disapproval. The white horse was so revered that it featured on the flags of Lower Saxony and North Rhine-Westphalia. Even earlier, white horses were celebrated by the Celts in Great Britain. The White Horse of Uffington (Oxfordshire, England) is Bronze Age hillside artefact, dating back approximately 3,000 years. The figure of a 374-foot long horse (perhaps representing the Celtic horse goddess Epona) was cut into the soil, its white coat naturally pigmented by the chalk beneath the turf.

The PLoS Genetics journal points out that most white horses carry a "graying-with-age mutation." They are born with a solid-colored coat which turns white by age of four to six. However, occasionally a pony is born with a solid white coat. Take, for example, the solid white mare named Cigale, born in 1957 out of solid brown parents from the Swiss Franches-Montagnes Horse population. Geneticists have studied all of Cigale's white-born descendants and isolated an inherited mutation in their pigment forming cells. Different horse populations, such as white Thoroughbreds, Arabians, and Camarillo White Horses, reveal independent pigmentation mutation events. In other words, the white horses in each equine family exhibit their own special brand of mutation leading to their white coats. But the common chromosomal factor appears to be what geneticists call the KIT gene, responsible not only for white horses but also for blonde people.

White horses appear in the religious literature of many lands. Here's a small sampling:

  • In the New Testament's Book of Revelation, one of the four horsemen of the Apocalypse rides a white horse.
  • In Japan, the white horse is a Shinto symbol of purity and divine authority.
  • In Islam, the Prophet ascended to heaven on the back of a white horse.
  • In Hinduism, the god Kalki rides a white horse while brandishing a comet-like sword.
  • In Nordic lore, the god Odin rises a white horse named Sleipnir.
  • In Greek mythology, the white and winged Pegasus sprang from the blood of Medusa when Perseus decapitated her.
[Read the entire article in my guest blog at ColourLovers.com.]
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .

March 14, 2008

The Right Word (permalink)
"When the smoke from the fire seeps in through the nostrils, irritates the throat, and stings the eyes, we shut out the world of burning text, unable to remember what letterforms once lived on those sheets curling into ash."
Geof Huth


Suns & Book Burning, from Hartmann Schedel, ‘Nuremberg Chronicle’ (1493), XCIIv.  Via.
> read more from The Right Word . . .


Colorful Allusions (permalink)

by -Lori-

I sit on a purple bed, / Outside, the wall is red, / Thereby the apple hangs, / And the wasp, caught by the fangs, . . .

Gold wings across the sea! / Moonlight from tree to tree, / Sweet hair laid on my knee, / O, sweet knight, come to me!
—William Morris, "Golden Wings," 1858.

* Though printed in black and white, great literature is bursting with vibrant colour. In this rebus-style puzzle, color words and parts of words have been replaced with colored boxes. Try to guess the exact hue of each. Roll your mouse over the colored boxes to reveal the missing words. Click the colored boxes to learn more about each hue. Special thanks to Paul Dean for his colorful research.
 
> read more from Colorful Allusions . . .

March 13, 2008

Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:


The writings of J. Karl Bogartte are available here.
Printed collections of Forgotten Wisdom diagrams are available: Volume I from Mindful Greetings and Volumes II, III and IV from Amazon.  Selected posters are also available via Zazzle.
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .


Book of Whispers (permalink)
Piecing together the secret of the scarab . . .


 


Artwork via.
* The most profound secrets lie not wholly in knowledge, said the poet.  They lurk invisible in that vitalizing spark, intangible, yet as evident as the lightning—the seeker's soul.  Solitary digging for facts can reward one with great discoveries, but true secrets are not discovered—they are shared, passed on in confidence from one to another.  The genuine seeker listens attentively.

No secret can be transcribed, save in code, lest it—by definition—cease to be.  This Book of Whispers collects and encodes more than one hundred of humankind's most cherished secrets.  To be privy to the topics alone is a supreme achievement, as each contains and nurtures the seed of its hidden truth.  As possessor and thereby guardian of this knowledge, may you summon the courage to honor its secrets and to bequeath it to one worthy.
> read more from Book of Whispers . . .

March 12, 2008

Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
At last: a Rubik's Cube that even I can solve blindfolded (in 26 moves, no less!)


Source.  Via ffffound.
> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .


Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? (permalink)
What's the motto of the Toy Surprise creators at the Cracker Jack candy factory? 

"Think inside the box."
> read more from Did You Hear the One I Just Made Up? . . .

March 11, 2008

Forgotten Wisdom (permalink)
From Prof. Oddfellow's sketchbook:

"It is the sound that dreaming makes when it turns the earth."
J. Karl Bogartte


Printed collections of Forgotten Wisdom diagrams are available: Volume I from Mindful Greetings and Volumes II, III and IV from Amazon.  Selected posters are also available via Zazzle.
> read more from Forgotten Wisdom . . .


Colorful Allusions (permalink)

Rahel took off her new fingers, and had her old finger- colored fingers back. Not yellow, not green, not blue, not red. Not yellow.
—Arundhati Roy, The God of Small Things, 1998

* Though printed in black and white, great literature is bursting with vibrant colour. In this rebus-style puzzle, color words and parts of words have been replaced with colored boxes. Try to guess the exact hue of each. Roll your mouse over the colored boxes to reveal the missing words. Click the colored boxes to learn more about each hue. Special thanks to Paul Dean for his colorful research.
 
> read more from Colorful Allusions . . .

March 10, 2008

Semicolon's Dream Journal (permalink)
I dreamed I attended the gala Semicolon Ball at the Ducal Palace, where I danced the night away with John McIntyre of the Baltimore Sun.  John recalls the exhilaration that was National Grammar Day:

The cheers of the crowds lining the streets at the parade still echo in one’s ears.  It was a swirl of events, the hourly cannon fire salute from the Citadel, the Te Deum sung at the Cathedral, the torchlight procession and laying of a wreath at the Cenotaph of the Unknown Copy Editor, the fireworks display, the Semicolon Ball at the Ducal Palace, the governor’s generous clemency in releasing the detainees from the stockade at midnight.  A glorious day.

---

TootsNYC wrote:

I think it would be fun to dance the night away w/ John McIntyre.

(btw, have you read the last page of "The Wintersmith" by Terry Pratchett?  You should, you "tricksie semicolon," you.)
> read more from Semicolon's Dream Journal . . .


Neither Saint- Nor Sophist-Led (permalink)

Saint Marko
Patron of the Street Corner.

Saint Marko is known as the:
  • Watcher of watchers (people-watchers, night watchmen, everyday doings, etc.)
  • Patron of Metacommunication ("master of talking about talking about...")
  • Stockboy of the universe's good ideas
  • Spiritual accountant for the entities of Science, Religion, and Humanity
  • Caretaker of the most contorted imaginations, returning them to higher ground when they fall off the deep end of reality's waterfall
His most common symbol is a hairpin, in honor of his guardianship over hairpin turns.

He has had a color palette created in his name.

[CLC] Saint Marko

The symbols on the so-called "Runic Tablet of Saint Marko" depict various types of intersections.

(Thanks to Codename Gimmick!)
Who is your favorite imaginary saint?  Do share!
> read more from Neither Saint- Nor Sophist-Led . . .


Book of Whispers (permalink)
Piecing together the secret of the runes . . .


 
* The most profound secrets lie not wholly in knowledge, said the poet.  They lurk invisible in that vitalizing spark, intangible, yet as evident as the lightning—the seeker's soul.  Solitary digging for facts can reward one with great discoveries, but true secrets are not discovered—they are shared, passed on in confidence from one to another.  The genuine seeker listens attentively.

No secret can be transcribed, save in code, lest it—by definition—cease to be.  This Book of Whispers collects and encodes more than one hundred of humankind's most cherished secrets.  To be privy to the topics alone is a supreme achievement, as each contains and nurtures the seed of its hidden truth.  As possessor and thereby guardian of this knowledge, may you summon the courage to honor its secrets and to bequeath it to one worthy.
> read more from Book of Whispers . . .

March 9, 2008

Colorful Allusions (permalink)

by Batram

We found [mushrooms] in all shades of brown, yellow, and red, from velvet darks up to the most vivid orange scarlet. But most wonderful of all were the deep purple ones. Purple has always been to me the mystery color, the magician's color. All the mushrooms looked very wise and as if they could weave spells and incantations, but the purple ones were the Merlins of the wood.
—Una Hunt, Una Mary: The Inner Life of a Child, 1914.

* Though printed in black and white, great literature is bursting with vibrant colour. In this rebus-style puzzle, color words and parts of words have been replaced with colored boxes. Try to guess the exact hue of each. Roll your mouse over the colored boxes to reveal the missing words. Click the colored boxes to learn more about each hue. Special thanks to Paul Dean for his colorful research.
 
> read more from Colorful Allusions . . .

March 8, 2008

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)

by Tzatziki

Teardrops as Prisms

Intense moments in life can bring tears of both joy and pain. There can also be tears of something that transcends bodily feelings and emotions. These are tears of realization, when a union of some sort transforms into communion, or a passion transforms into compassion. "Bliss" might be the best word for this tearful state of being, though words are too limited. One way to inspire such tears is to look deeply into someone's eyes and to hold the gaze.

A friend once shared the insight that teardrops are prisms, reflecting and refracting angles and colors of life that can't be seen with dry eyes. Mozambique author Mia Couto suggests that tearful eyes are liquid conduits to the world of the unconscious, and that through the prism of a teardrop you can see visions of things not as you wish they were but as they really are. It's as if teardrops dissolve away one's defensive walls to reveal the archetypes dwelling in the background, the mythology taking place beneath the surface of the workaday world.

Throughout the ages, the joys, pains, and revelations of life have invited artists to gaze through teardrop prisms and to share their visions.

[Read the entire article in my guest blog at ColourLovers.com.]

> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .

March 7, 2008

Inflationary Lyrics (permalink)

Full-size image here.
SONG: Devil's Dime
ARTIST: Zakk Wylde

ORIGINAL LYRIC:

Living on the Devil's dime
Devil's dime
Everything's paid and we're feeling fine
On the Devil's dime
Devil's dime
The wheels are rolling and we're running blind
On the Devil's dime
Devil's dime
Everything's paid and we're feeling fine
On the Devil's dime
Devil's dime

ADJUSTED FOR INFLATION:

Paid for by the Devil's quarter
Devil's quarter
Heads or tails of Yahweh's thwarter
On the Devil's quarter
Devil's quarter
Paying the price and ending up shorter
On the Devil's quarter
Devil's quarter
Heads or tails of Yahweh's thwarter
On the Devil's quarter
Devil's quarter
* Payphones used to take dimes, but now they take quarters.  Isn't it time to update song lyrics to reflect the realities of inflation?  Alas, it's vastly easier to rhyme the word "dime" than the word "quarter," but here at Inflationary Lyrics Headquarters we have risen to the challenge.  Please join the fun and share your own inflationary lyrics, with both the "before" and "after" versions!
> read more from Inflationary Lyrics . . .


Colorful Allusions (permalink)

Big gray [moths] with reddish markings, pale blue- green, yellow with lavender, and red and yellow."

"What do you mean by 'red and yellow?'" asked the Bird Woman so quickly that the girl almost jumped.

"Not exactly red," explained Elnora, with tremulous voice. "A reddish, yellowish brown, with canary- coloured spots and gray lines on their wings."
—Gene Stratton-Porter, A Girl of the Limberlost, 1909.

* Though printed in black and white, great literature is bursting with vibrant colour. In this rebus-style puzzle, color words and parts of words have been replaced with colored boxes. Try to guess the exact hue of each. Roll your mouse over the colored boxes to reveal the missing words. Click the colored boxes to learn more about each hue. Special thanks to Paul Dean for his colorful research.
 
> read more from Colorful Allusions . . .

March 6, 2008

Glued Snippets (permalink)
> read more from Glued Snippets . . .


I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)

"A key cries out in the act of unlocking."
J. Karl Bogartte
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .

March 5, 2008

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)

Artwork by Eva-Fiore Kovacovsky.
"Horses are, in fact, natural Taoists. ... Taoism is best known in popular culture for the 'yin-yang' circle, its two interlocking tadpole-like symbols representing the balance of opposites in the universe and in the human psyche: white and black, light and dark, sound and silence, doing something and doing nothing.  To the relentlessly assertive, patriarchal Western mind, the Taoist picture of reality at first appears contrary to everything we believe because it asks us to consider the opposite of our normal inclinations.  One of the most famous quotes from the Tao Te Ching advises us to 'know the yang, but keep to the yin,' which often appears in translation as 'know the masculine but keep to the feminine.'  When I was with horses, I began to live this philosophy."
Linda Kohanov, The Tao of Equus
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Book of Whispers (permalink)
Piecing together the secret of the ruined castle . . .


 
* The most profound secrets lie not wholly in knowledge, said the poet.  They lurk invisible in that vitalizing spark, intangible, yet as evident as the lightning—the seeker's soul.  Solitary digging for facts can reward one with great discoveries, but true secrets are not discovered—they are shared, passed on in confidence from one to another.  The genuine seeker listens attentively.

No secret can be transcribed, save in code, lest it—by definition—cease to be.  This Book of Whispers collects and encodes more than one hundred of humankind's most cherished secrets.  To be privy to the topics alone is a supreme achievement, as each contains and nurtures the seed of its hidden truth.  As possessor and thereby guardian of this knowledge, may you summon the courage to honor its secrets and to bequeath it to one worthy.
> read more from Book of Whispers . . .

March 4, 2008

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
"It's better to be naive than jaded."
Jenny Holzer


"Jaded" by artist Natalie Schulze.  See other views here.
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


Colorful Allusions (permalink)

The sun came down through miles of leaves and got broken up like a pointillist painting, deep green and dapple shadows but brilliant light in a soaring deep green super- bower, a perpetual lime- green light, green- and- gold afternoon, stillness, perpendicular peace, wood- scented, with the cars going by on Route 84 just adding pneumatic sound effects, sheee- ooooooooo, like a gentle wind.
—Tom Wolfe, The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, 1968

* Though printed in black and white, great literature is bursting with vibrant colour. In this rebus-style puzzle, color words and parts of words have been replaced with colored boxes. Try to guess the exact hue of each. Roll your mouse over the colored boxes to reveal the missing words. Click the colored boxes to learn more about each hue. Special thanks to Paul Dean for his colorful research.
 
> read more from Colorful Allusions . . .

March 3, 2008

Semicolon's Dream Journal (permalink)
I dreamed I took some R & R at Semicolon Lakes.


Picture source.
> read more from Semicolon's Dream Journal . . .


I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .

March 2, 2008

Book of Whispers (permalink)
Piecing together the secret of the rose . . .


 


A red rose misted with water and illuminated by multicolored LED flashlights.  Photo by Tio.
* The most profound secrets lie not wholly in knowledge, said the poet.  They lurk invisible in that vitalizing spark, intangible, yet as evident as the lightning—the seeker's soul.  Solitary digging for facts can reward one with great discoveries, but true secrets are not discovered—they are shared, passed on in confidence from one to another.  The genuine seeker listens attentively.

No secret can be transcribed, save in code, lest it—by definition—cease to be.  This Book of Whispers collects and encodes more than one hundred of humankind's most cherished secrets.  To be privy to the topics alone is a supreme achievement, as each contains and nurtures the seed of its hidden truth.  As possessor and thereby guardian of this knowledge, may you summon the courage to honor its secrets and to bequeath it to one worthy.
> read more from Book of Whispers . . .

March 1, 2008

I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)

by Claire L. Evans

Unusual Color Wheels

The first color wheel (a.k.a. color circle) has been traced back to Sir Isaac Newton, who in 1706 arranged red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo, and violet into a natural progression on a rotating disk. As the disk spins, the colors blur together so rapidly that the human eye sees white. Artists have been experimenting with color wheels ever since, finding inspiration in everything from cocktail umbrellas, river rocks, autumn leaves, pencil shavings, to juggling.

The Happy Hour color wheel consists of exotic cocktail umbrellas. It was created by Bright Lights Little City:

 

The Rocks color wheel is a collection of stones from Salmon River, Idaho. It was assembled by Purl Bee:

 

This Yarn Skeinlet color wheel features dyes made of cochineal (ground up cactus-eating scale insects), osage orange, chamomile, indigo and logwood. It was created by Sarah of the Blue Garter blog:

 

The Circle of Life color wheel was created by Thalandor as a tribute to the artist Mother Nature:

 

This Kusudama (Medicine Ball) color wheel was created by Origami artist Vanessa Gould:

 

The Pencil Shavings color wheel was photographed by Myruby:

 

This Garden Blossom color wheel is the work of Tiny Haus:

 

The Juggler color wheel was painted by Kenneth Callicutt:

 

The Chalk color wheel was photographed near Parc De La Villette, Paris, by Jacobz:



[Read the entire article in my guest blog at ColourLovers.com.]

> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .


I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought (permalink)

Photo source.
This photo is entitled "Blinded by Money," but we'd say this guy has 20/20 vision.
> read more from I Found a Penny Today, So Here's a Thought . . .



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Original Content Copyright © 2014 by Craig Conley. All rights reserved.